"I'm concerned my child isn't learning as quickly as others."


Every child struggles to learn new skills. Know what matters and when to get help.

Learning and thinking skills begin developing from a very early age. You may notice that your baby is always looking around, wide-eyed with wonder and curious about new objects. Or that your 10-month- old is determined to explore every inch of their world – and loves making lots of noise with objects (pots and pans, no doubt). Your toddler may get a kick out of stacking blocks (and knocking them down) and matching colors and shapes. Your preschooler begins to learn the rules to simple games, use objects correctly, scribbles, copies letters, writes words and eventually is counting and reading. While it's true that every child's learns and develops skills at slightly different rates, the sequence in which these skills are learned is the same for most children.

How to help your child's learning and thinking skills:

  • Parent-child interactions are ideal moments to foster learning and thinking
  • Point out everyday things to your child and name them
  • Talk to your child about what you are doing as you go through the day
  • Use age-appropriate toys and activities to engage their curiosity
  • Play with puzzles and blocks to work fine motor and problem solving skills
  • Read to your child every day
  • Play counting or matching games regularly

When to be concerned:

  • Your child is learning much, much slower than other children the same age
  • Your child’s language, motor, and/or self-help skills are all delayed
  • Your child does not appear to be interested in those around them
  • If your child loses skills he or she once had

What to do if you are concerned:

  • Contact your pediatrician